Waves

I’ve been thinking a lot about waves lately.

Sound is what we call the aural perception of air pressure variations induced by any object vibrating at a rate in the range of our hearing, say 20Hz-20kHz. 19,200Hz, used for audiostrobe encoding has only 2 samples to be fully expressed at a CD quality sample rate of 44,100Hz. Any idea of the sine wave that existed before it was digitised has been completely lost – hence MP3s with audiostrobe have to be high quality, 320kbs, no compression.

It’s fun playing with pitch, envelope  and interaction of multiple wave forms in Mind Workstation or other synthesiser. Familiar musical instruments emerge from just a tone as various parameters are tweaked. As it is often what’s there first whenever my mind becomes vacant, it seems my brain/mind likes visualising wave forms, wondering how they will look or sound and going on to work out how they may be realised. All but the most basic flash-flash AudioStrobe track manipulates frequency, wave form, amplitude and phase to create the complex envelopes that we perceive as patterns.

The only real wave form is the sine – all others exist only in maths and the illusion arising from many mixed sines. As it is impossible to perfectly fill a corner with curves, chaos exists in the corners, the devil in the details, the moment where probability becomes reality, the collapse of the wave function into particle, rounding according to the precision of the Universe.

Noise is something different – it is pure chaos with no sample obviously related to the one before or after. That said, I’m sure you’ve listened to a white noise track and heard familiar sounds, even voices. In terms of random probability there’s no reason why a noise source shouldn’t form a complete sentence. There’s enough noise sources in nature to account for vast amounts of probability – I’m sure that the rustling leaves of at least one tree has revealed the Key to the Universe.

“Sine” is a trigonometric term. Its nature is illustrated by the path of a point onthe circumference of a circle as the circle rolls along a flat surface. The mathematical relationship between sine and circle requires the illusive Pi. The circumference of a circle is not evenly divisible by any known number – Pi contains the work of centuries and monumental computing power – our nearest estimate of the number of diameters it takes to get around a circle – 3.14159 suffices for my needs.

At the centre of every circle/wheel there is a point, the axis of infinite bisections of the circle. Once you start looking you find infinity everywhere . The symbol of the point in a circle corresponds to our Sun.

Our Sun bathes us in sine waves right across the electromagnetic spectrum. The white light to which we have become accustomed is made up of many wavelengths. Our optical data input is designed to function correctly in the range of brightness a little less than that of looking into the Sun and a little greater than that of a moonless night. Apart from the piece of the Sun’s spectrum that we see, we also feel those just outside our sight – infrared warmth to ultraviolet burns.

Our orbit of the Sun is not quite circular, but is pretty close, which makes planetary climate management a lot easier than if our orbit had been more elliptical (probably to the extent that we wouldn’t be here). As our Sun hurtles through the Universe, in accordance with its path in our galaxy and our galaxy’s path towards Andromeda and Andromeda’s to who knows where, we leave helical traces of our chemical and electromagnetic existence. The helix is a circle unwound into the third dimension.

The Moon is largely responsible for the tides of our seas and oceans. Waves in water are the waves most readily brought to mind. All consequences of the cosmic dance of our Earth, our Moon and our Sun. The conjunction of earth, air, water and fire found below the high tide mark at sunset or dawn has always been special to me – a sense of continuity from the earliest of life.

The point, the sine wave, the circle and the helix exist throughout the microcosm/macrocosm spectrum. Or is it better to say that the spectrum of our existence is defined by our individual blend of waves and forms.

It amuses me that contemplation on the wave led to meditation on the point in the circle. If we could see far enough for long enough I am certain that there is a Point fixed in the Universe, its velocity zero relative to the sum of motion of all other points/objects.

The rise and fall of nations and civilisations is wave-like. Those known in history suggest that wealth and power to not a long-term nation make.

If it’s really important to know how big and small, near and distant things are while our planet and so many of its passengers here and now need help that only money can buy, then we must expect big science to conduct more and more expensive experiments for ever diminishing returns. If we really need to impose our beliefs by force, then we must be prepared for an endless military expenditure – beliefs don’t impose. We know enough.  We have consumerised that knowledge enough, we have produced enough, we have consumed enough, we have fought enough. The pendulum of the state of this civilisation has reached an extreme, pauses, never easier to nudge one way or the other to begin a swing along another of the infinite number of the circle’s bisector. Or maybe we have no choice – maybe precession will decide for us. There is always choice.

As above, so below. The vision of the perfect point, distinguished by no other, also describes the Point that I call “I”, ancient, guarded behind the veil of perception and the abyss of deception. There are many ways to the Point, many enhanced by waves of sound and light. The vision of the Point is, I believe, the Point we so very often question. It is the “no difference” required in order for us to identify as one species, one emanation of the Divine.

Happy contemplating he says with a cheerful wave…

Cheers,
Craig

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: